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News in
Algeria






News in
Algeria




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Atlas Algeria


K.A Former Pupils Worldwide
If you are a former pupil of Kilmarnock Academy
and you currently live or work in this country (or have lived in it for a period of time), then e-mail us at kaworldwide@kilmarnockacademy.co.uk with your details. The essential details are: your name; the years you attended Kilmarnock Academy; where in the country you live or work (if you no longer live or work in this country, please state the years you were in residence there).

If you want to - and it does make things a lot more interesting - you can also provide us with a brief account of a favourite place or fond memory or favourite anecdote or local customs or local cuisine (or anything else about this country that you'd like to share with us). You can, if you wish, also include one or two photographs of places you lived in or visited during your stay in this country.


K.A. International - Worldwide Learning Network
If you know of a school in this country (possibly one that your own children have attended) that would be interested in developing links and engaging in joint projects with pupils at K.A., then please e-mail kaworldwide@kilmarnockacademy.co.uk with contact details. You can get more information on this initiative by clicking here.

N. McIlvanney 2005

K.A Former Pupils in Algeria

Name                                                   Years attended K.A.                                   Area, City or Town of Residence



K.A. Pupils' Postcards
If you are a pupil or former pupil of Kilmarnock Academy
and you have visited this country, then e-mail us at postcard@kilmarnockacademy.co.uk with your details. The essential details are: your name; the years you attended Kilmarnock Academy; where in the country you visited.

If you want to - and it does make this page a lot more worthwhile - you can also provide us with a brief account of a favourite place or fond memory or unusual experience or local customs or local cuisine or first impressions or lasting impressions. (You can, if you wish, also include one or two photographs of a place you visited in this country).


N. McIlvanney 2005

K.A Pupils' Postcards from Algeria

Name                                                   Years attended K.A.                                    Area, City or Town Visited


Country (long form)

Democratic and Popular Republic of Algeria
Capital
Algiers
Total Area
919,594.96 sq mi
2,381,740.00 sq km
Population
31,193,917 (July 2000 est.)
Estimated Population in 2050
52,754,132
Languages
Arabic (official), French, Berber dialects
Literacy
61.6% total, 73.9% male, 49% female (1995 est.)
Religions
Sunni Muslim (state religion) 99%, Christian and Jewish 1%
Life Expectancy
68.34 male, 71.02 female (2000 est.)
Government Type
republic
Currency
1 Algerian dinar (DA) = 100 centimes
GDP (per capita)
$4,700 (1999 est.)
Labor Force (by occupation)
government 29.5%, agriculture 22%, construction and public works 16.2%, industry 13.6%, commerce and services 13.5%, transportation and communication 5.2% (1989)
Industry
petroleum, natural gas, light industries, mining, electrical, petrochemical, food processing
Agriculture
wheat, barley, oats, grapes, olives, citrus, fruits; sheep, cattle
Arable Land
3%
Exports
petroleum, natural gas, and petroleum products 97%
Imports
capital goods, food and beverages, consumer goods
Natural Resources
petroleum, natural gas, iron ore, phosphates, uranium, lead, zinc
Current Environmental Issues
soil erosion from overgrazing and other poor farming practices; desertification; dumping of raw sewage, petroleum refining wastes, and other industrial effluents is leading to the pollution of rivers and coastal waters; Mediterranean Sea, in particular, becoming polluted from oil wastes, soil erosion, and fertilizer runoff; inadequate supplies of potable water
Telephones (main lines in use)
1.176 million (1995)
Telephones (mobile cellular)
33,500 (1999)
Internet Service Providers (ISPs)
1 (1999)

Despite positive signs that Algeria's security situation - which a few years ago was nothing less than a disaster - is stabilising, travel in the country still poses significant risks. The southeast, where in early 2003 several foreigners were abducted, should be avoided altogether.

Most acts of political violence occur in the north and are targeted against the government. There are occasional, indiscriminate attacks on civilians, mostly bomb raids on villages or vehicle-jackings. In the southeast, the risk of abduction is compounded by the presence of smugglers and bandits.